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EC Number
General Information
Commentary
Reference
evolution
Aerobic bacteria and fungi typically express ATP- and NADPH-dependent enzymes, which were initially named aryl-aldehyde dehydrogenases (NADP+), but are meanwhile also mostly referred to as carboxylate reductases (CARs). These enzymes are classified as the EC 1.2.1.30 family. CAR sequences of the EC 1.2.1.30 family fall into four distinct subgroups
evolution
analysis of highly conserved signature sequences of CARs, overview
evolution
CAR phylogenetic analysis and tree
malfunction
lack of posttranslational phosphopantetheinylation of a serine group in the recombinant CAR reduces the activity of recombinantly expressed enzyme
malfunction
replacement of His237, Glu433, Ser595, Tyr844, and Lys848 by Ala abolishes CAR activity
malfunction
the purified CAR with a mutation to its conserved serine idue appears to degrade into separate A- and R-domains when incubated at room temperature
more
analysis of A-T-R domain architecture with relaxed substrate specificity, structure-function-relationship and potential as biocatalysts for organic synthesis, respectively. Identification of key residues for CAR activity
more
structure homology modeling
more
structure-function analysis and structure comparisons
physiological function
carboxylic acid reductases (CARs) are valuable biocatalysts due to their ability to reduce a broad range of carboxylate substrates into the corresponding aldehyde products. CARs are multi-domain enzymes with separate catalytic domains for the adenylation and the subsequent reduction of substrates. Inter-domain dynamics are crucial for the catalytic activities of CARs
Results 1 - 10 of 16 > >>